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Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes. #6: Blessed are the pure in heart…

The 8 Beatitudes, or blessings, or the be-attitudes, are the core of the core teachings Jesus came here to share, but what do they really mean?

5:8 #6 Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.

The Greek word for pure means unmixed, unadulterated, unalloyed. It requires self-examination. Is our work done from motives of service or from motives of pay or acknowledgment, from being self-less, or from self-display, from a feeling of unity, or of superiority?  This is about intent, and perceptions.

It is difficult to see a purity beyond our own flawed perceptions, because we see everything through that flawed lens. The purer our sight, the purer the lens through which we view everything, the more purity we recognize. Total pureness recognizes total pureness.

The only way we can see with such clarity is when we surrender all we are to the Divine and see ourselves and others as God sees us, which is through the lens of love.

So, then, this sixth beatitude might read:

Oh the godlike joy of choosing from pure intentions because when we do, through surrender, we see everything as God sees, which is always through the lens of love. That is joy!


Research Sources

  • William Barclay’s Commentary on The Gospel of Matthew
  • The Hidden Gospel, Neil Douglas-Klotz

Next: #7: Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #7 Blessed are the peacemakers…

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Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes. #1: Blessed are the poor in spirit…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #2 Blessed are those who mourn…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #3 Blessed are the meek…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #4 Blessed are those who hunger…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #5 Blessed are the merciful…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes. #5: Blessed are the merciful…

The 8 Beatitudes, or blessings, or the be-attitudes, are the core of the core teachings Jesus came here to share, but what do they really mean?

5:7 #5 Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy.

There is more to this beatitude than the obvious. The Hebrew word for mercy is one of several untranslatable words where our English is insufficient. It means to see others as God sees them. When we do that, like God, not only do we not judge them, but also we respond with compassion and understanding. Even more, it is seeing ourselves in others, like a reflection. It is being that which we choose to receive. We can only see as God sees through surrender.

So the translation of the fifth beatitude might read:

O the god-like joy when we get right inside other people until we can see with their eyes, think with their thoughts, feel with their feelings, see them as God sees them, for when we do, our hearts open with love and compassion. To be able to see as God sees is only possible through surrender. In doing so, we, too, receive mercy. That is joy!


Research Sources

  • William Barclay’s Commentary on The Gospel of Matthew
  • The Hidden Gospel, Neil Douglas-Klotz

Next: #6: Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #6 Blessed are the pure in heart…

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Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes. #1: Blessed are the poor in spirit…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #2 Blessed are those who mourn…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #3 Blessed are the meek…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #4 Blessed are those who hunger…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes. #4: Blessed are those who hunger…

The 8 Beatitudes, or blessings, or the be-attitudes, are the core of the core teachings Jesus came here to share, but what do they really mean?

5:6 #4 Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.

The hunger which this beatitude describes is no genteel hunger. It is the hunger of the person who is starving for food, and the thirst of one who will die unless they drink.

There is one further point which only emerges in the Greek. It could have said I want some of the bread, but not the whole loaf. I want some of the water, but not the entire container. The wording Jesus used means I want the whole loaf of bread. I want the entire container of water. I want it all.

I really struggled for days with the research on this beatitude because whatever I found, Jesus told me through prayer was inadequate for what he really said. That it lacked the total truth and the power of this message. So finally after several days, and still being told I was missing something important, I was guided to do an automatic writing exercise where I pray, ask the question, and then write whatever comes through to me. This is what I received:

Write what I tell you. Write of love. Write of longing for a right relationship with God. A loving relationship. A powerful relationship. That the only way we can be right with God is to surrender to God’s will, and allow God to direct our relationship. A right relationship with God is not from us directing the way, but God doing the Divine will through us, empowering us, empowering others. That is a right relationship with God.

I asked if there is anything else?  He said,

It’s our hearts. The longing in our hearts. We have to really want a right relationship with God, not to be afraid of it, but to embrace it. Not a tepid desire, but an all or nothing quest, knowing that this is where lies our bliss and we won’t’ settle for anything less than the highest and best. He said talk about the Truth. The burning Truth. The purifying truth. A truth that challenges us to dare to live as God would have us live. How much, how badly do we want a right relationship with God? A loving relationship? A powerful relationship? An all-time 24/7 relationship, not just when we don’t have anything better to do. All or nothing.

What I finally realized:

It’s not that we must have goodness so that we can connect with God, it’s that we connect with God so that we can have goodness. God is our source for goodness. If we want all from God, then we must first surrender and give our all to God.

Wow. That really is a challenge. Like Jesus shared during the prayer message, there is only one way we can accomplish this directive, and it is with…

Surrender, for only through surrender do we have the total access to and fulfillment of goodness and right relationship with God for which we hunger. Do you sense the surrender pattern Jesus is teaching us in the first half of the beatitudes? When you really think about it, Surrender is the answer to everything. Surrender is the answer.

So…

O the godlike joy when we hunger and thirst for a right relationship with God as the highest priority in our lives because we want all that God offers. In our heart-longing desperation we surrender everything we are and do to the Divine, allowing the loving, purifying and powerful goodness to so fill us to overflowing that we can’t but live and share that goodness all of the time – God’s will flowing through us. Through surrender we are satisfied. This is joy


Research Sources

  • William Barclay’s Commentary on The Gospel of Matthew
  • The Hidden Gospel, Neil Douglas-Klotz

Next: #5: Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #5 Blessed are the merciful…

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Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes. #1: Blessed are the poor in spirit…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #2 Blessed are those who mourn…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #3 Blessed are those who hunger…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes. #3: Blessed are the meek…

The 8 Beatitudes, or blessings, or the be-attitudes, are the core of the core teachings Jesus came here to share, but what do they really mean?

5:5 #3 Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.

Meek doesn’t mean weak, wimpy, shyly cowering in silence. In Aramaic, the word translated as “meek” means literally those who have softened what is rigid inside. That means when we are rigid about our thinking we are not open to any other viewpoint, even God’s. In our rigidity, we block ourselves from receiving and experiencing the Real Truth, the Eternal Truth. When we soften inside, we become teachable.

Restated:

Oh the god-like joy when we soften what is rigid inside and become teachable, opening to and accepting the Eternal Truth, freeing us to experience the highest and best physical life possible while on planet earth. This is joy.

Research Sources

  • William Barclay’s Commentary on The Gospel of Matthew
  • The Hidden Gospel, Neil Douglas-Klotz

Next: #4: Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #3 Blessed are those who hunger…

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Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes. #1: Blessed are the poor in spirit…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #2 Blessed are those who mourn…

Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes. #2: Blessed are those who mourn…

The 8 Beatitudes, or blessings, or the be-attitudes, are the core of the core teachings Jesus came here to share, but what do they really mean?


5:4 #2 Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.

The specific Greek word for ‘to mourn’ used originally, is the strongest word for mourning in the Greek language. It is the word which is used for mourning for the dead, for the passionate lament for one who was loved.

For what do we mourn as if it were a type of death? When we are spiritually destitute and finally surrender all to our Source, we realize what a mess we’ve made of our lives. We mourn for our regrets, our mistakes, things we said or did wrong, perhaps hurting ourselves, or others. Words and actions we wish we could retract but we can’t, regrets that tear us up inside. We mourn that, in our ignorance, we blunder our way through life, too often missing out on what might have been our bliss if we’d seen or understood more clearly. It is when we look back on our lives at the moment of death and regret what we didn’t have the courage to go for and that it is now too late.

So, paraphrased:

Oh the God-like joy when we finally admit and mourn for our mistakes, for the shambles we made of our lives, because we are comforted by the realization that, mistakes and all, we are loved by God anyway, unconditionally, without judgment, which is precisely how we are to love ourselves, and others. There is no greater comfort than this. To be loved anyway. This is joy.

Research Sources

  • William Barclay’s Commentary on The Gospel of Matthew
  • The Hidden Gospel, Neil Douglas-Klotz

Next: #3: Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes: #3 Blessed are the meek…

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Powerful Life-Changing Beatitudes. #1: Blessed are the poor in spirit…